READING AND TEACHING HENRY GIROUX - Memorial AND TEACHING HENRY GIROUX Amarjit Singh and Clar...

download READING AND TEACHING HENRY GIROUX - Memorial   AND TEACHING HENRY GIROUX Amarjit Singh and Clar Doyle Prepared and Designed by: Samir Muhaisen Graduate Student Faculty of

of 509

  • date post

    02-Apr-2018
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    229
  • download

    4

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of READING AND TEACHING HENRY GIROUX - Memorial AND TEACHING HENRY GIROUX Amarjit Singh and Clar...

  • READING AND TEACHING HENRY GIROUX

    Amarjit Singh and Clar Doyle

    Prepared and Designed by:

    Samir Muhaisen

    Graduate Student

    Faculty of Education

    Memorial University of Newfoundland

    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1B 3X8

  • FOREWORD

    This book is built on Girouxs work, which we have collected and collated, and it covers the

    period from 1979 to 2005. Over this time, Girouxs thinking and writing show a remarkable

    evolution.

    The following section of the book is the material for Reading Giroux. This section of the book

    lays the foundation for our work in education and culture that will be shared in Teaching

    Giroux

    2

    Table of Contents

  • 3

    READING AND TEACHING HENRY GIROUXTable of Contents

    Chapter One

    Introduction

    Education

    Schooling

    Students

    Teachers

    Language

    Voice

    Chapter Two

    Democracy

    Culture

    Cultural CapitalCultural Studies

    Race

    Gender

    Chapter Three

    Pedagogy

    Ideology

    Chapter Four

    Curriculum

    Higher Education

    Chapter Five

    Graduate Research

    Classroom Teaching

    Cultural Production

    Reading Guide

    Chapter Six

    Teaching Internship

    Chapter One in a Nutshell

    Chapter Two in a Nutshell

    Chapter Three in a Nutshell

    Chapter Four in a Nutshell

    Higher Education in a

    Nutshell

    Henry Giroux

  • INTRODUCTIONIn many instances, Giroux is able to show that he can cut through the

    logic and unmask the ideology of new right and neo-liberal democratic

    claims: Within the discourse of neo-liberalism, democracy becomes

    synonymous with free markets while issues of equality, social justice,

    and freedom are stripped of any substantive meaning (2004, p. xviii). We

    are reminded by Henry Giroux and Susan Giroux of the need to balance

    this reality by advocating a rationale for the important and necessary use

    of the democratic imperative to expand individual and collective capacities

    to self govern(2004, p.38).

    4

    Table of Contents

  • INTRODUCTION

    We believe that Girouxs writings, along with the work of other notable educational and social

    theorists, have had a tremendous influence on everyday thought and action.

    The editors of Pedagogy and the Politics of Hope rightly claim that Girouxs work is

    prodigious and multidimensional. However, these editors do manage to put Girouxs work in

    quite a neat shell when they claim that his struggle for a radical democracy, involves the

    effort to expand the possibility for social justice, freedom, and egalitarian social relations in

    the educational, economic, political, and cultural domains that locate men, women, and

    children in everyday life (p. ix).

    5

    Table of Contents

  • INTRODUCTION

    As Peter McLaren acknowledges, in the forward for Teachers as Intellectuals, it is difficult to

    do justice to the scope and critical depth of Henry Girouxs work.

    As we probe Girouxs notion of teachers as transformative intellectuals, we realize that he

    means that they understand the nature of their own self-formation, and have a future, see the

    importance of education as a public discourse, and have some sense of mission in providing

    students which they need to become critical citizens (1993b, p. 15).

    6

    Table of Contents

  • INTRODUCTION

    In other words, Giroux asks, how do we get to be the people we are? Such questions make any

    examination of the transmission of curriculum seem facile. Giroux is digging deep now. He no

    longer is willing to ask the easy questions. Part of his emerging answer is that power can be

    seen as a concrete set of practices that produces social forms through which distinct

    experiences and subjectivities are shaped (1997a, p. xi). Giroux has proven himself to be the

    explorer as opposed to the mere navigator.

    7

    Table of Contents

  • READING GIROUX

    Reading The Immediate

    Table of Contents

  • READING THE IMMEDIATE

    CHAPTER ONE

    Education

    Schooling

    Students

    Teachers

    Language

    Voice

    Chapter One in a Nutshell

    9

    Table of Contents

  • Education

    Table of Contents

  • Building on the work of Cornelius Castoriadis and Raymond Williams, Giroux argues that,

    "Education, in the broadest sense, is a principal feature of politics because it provides the

    capacities, knowledge, skills, and social relations through which individuals recognize

    themselves as social and political agents" (Giroux, 2004, p. 115).

    EDUCATION

    11

    Table of Contents

  • EducationBroad Definition

    A Feature of Politics Exceeds the

    limits of educational institutions

    A collectively produced set

    of experiences that provide:

    A- Critical understanding for

    everyday oppression

    B- Dynamics to construct alternative

    political cultures

    Table of Contents

  • Giroux & Aronowitz encourage educators to ask, what is the nature of education and what it

    means as a process of social and, hence, self-formation (1993, p.126). According to Giroux

    and Aronowitz, this means that educators need to involve themselves with social movements

    and groups that work in oppositional public spheres outside of schools, around broader

    educational issues. Giroux and Aronowitz use the term schooling to mean that which takes

    place within institutions that are directly or indirectly related to the state through funding or

    regulation. Education, on the other hand, is much more broadly defined, and is not limited to

    established institutions but can take place at many other sites. It is important to Giroux and

    Aronowitz that we begin to destroy the myth that education and schooling are the same thing

    and that expertise and academic credentials are distinguishing marks of the intellectual; and,

    equally important, such educational work could also promote critical analyses of schooling

    itself and its relations to other institutions included in the state public sphere(p.129).

    EDUCATION

    13

    Table of Contents

  • In an ideal fashion, at least from a critical perspective, Giroux and Aronowitz view

    education as representing a collectively produced set of experiences organized around

    issues and concerns that allow for a critical understanding of everyday oppression as

    well as the dynamics involved in constructing alternative political cultures (1993, p.

    127). Ideally, such forms of learning and action would be directed toward the

    elimination of class, social, and gender oppression. Such intellectual development and

    growth, with its focus on the political, functions to create organic intellectuals and to

    develop a notion of active citizenry based on self-dedication of a group of learning and

    social interaction that have a fundamental connection to the idea of human emancipation

    (p. 127).

    EDUCATION

    14

    Table of Contents

  • Education in Social Debate

    Table of Contents

  • Giroux believes that there are authentic opportunities, in varied public spheres, to help develop

    collective power and in turn such power can be used in the development of alternative cultures. The

    alternative cultures, then, can get lived out in new forms of social relations and practices. We usually

    do not talk about education in this way. However, when we peel back the what-are-we doing- today

    layers of education, we are really talking about producing meaning and cultures. Education, in the

    way we are talking about it here, becomes a vehicle for social mobility for those who are privileged

    to have the resource and power to make their choices matterand a form of social constraint for

    those who lack such resources and for whom choice and accountability reflect a legacy of broken

    promises and bad faith" (Giroux, 2003b, pp. 80, 81). In the introduction for Critical Pedagogy, the

    State, and Cultural Struggle, Giroux and McLaren spell out their view of public education in North

    America. They claim that the debate is fundamentally about the relevance of democracy, social

    criticism, and the meaning of our future lives. Giroux and McLaren believe that we have failed to

    recognize the general relevance of education as a public service and the importance of deliberately

    translating educational theory into a community related discourse capable of reaching into and

    animating public culture and life(1989, p. xiii).

    EDUCATION

    16

    Table of Contents

  • Gerouxs observation of education

    Table of Contents

  • Giroux and McLaren are blunt in their claim that conservatives wish to rewrite the past from

    the perspective of the privileged and the powerful. We can readily see this in so many of the

    writings that represent, and are often funded by, the conservative wing in our democracy. These

    writings often disdain the democratic possibilities of pluralism, as well as the forms of

    pedagogy that critically engage issues central to developing an informed democratic public.

    Giroux and McLaren go on to state that there is little talk about the ethical and political

    demands of democratic culture and public responsibility. They believe we need to create a

    language of possibility. They further believe th